Footage from inside Thailand cave shows trapped boys' escape route

Footage from inside Thailand cave shows trapped boys' escape route

Some have been able to see the boys through a glass panel, others have been allowed closer, but had to wear protective suits and stand two meters away.

Chaiwetch Thanapaisal is director of Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital.

This handout video grab taken from footage released by the Royal Thai Navy yesterday (July 11) shows a member of the "Wild Boars" Thai youth football team being moved on a stretcher during a rescue operation inside the Tham Luang cave in Khun Nam Nang Non Forest Park in Mae Sai district.

Thongchai Lertwilairatanapong, a public health inspector, said the boys lost an average of 2 kilograms while they were trapped.

Two of the first group had lung infection as well, and will need medicine for the next seven days.

Details also emerged about the rescue, with the boys sedated and passed on stretchers along the twisting, narrow passageways, and tributes flowed for the worldwide team of rescuers who never gave up in the quest to save the team.

Thai navy SEALs posted a almost six-minute video on their Facebook page that shows rescue workers pass along green stretchers in which the boys were being transported.

They are set to undergo in-depth mental health evaluations, but CBS reports that they are showing few signs of stress.

He also paid a tribute to former Thai navy SEAL, Saman Kunan, who died last week during the rescue mission.

The Brits who discovered them were among the elite divers who flew out after the Thai authorities begged the world for help. The children were well taken care of in the cave.

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He hopes England will be more suited to their style of play, but added that recovering from two extended games will be hard . When they face England, both sides will already know whether France or Belgium have reached the final.

Narongsak Osatanakorn, the official overseeing the rescue operation, said the boys should not be blamed for their near tragedy.

"This is clearly a time of grief for the Harris family, magnified by the physical and emotional demands of being part of this week's highly complex and ultimately successful rescue mission".

A Belgian rescue diver involved in the operation told Dutch broadcaster NOS that ultimately not much diving was required on the way out, because a lot of water had been pumped out of the cave.

He said, "The situation went beyond just being a rescue mission and became a symbol of unity among man".

Thailand's decision to dive the boys out despite their weak condition and lack of diving experience was made when a window of opportunity was provided by relatively mild weather.

On Wednesday, they too were recovering, nursing battered hands and feet from wading through the cold water in the cave to reach the boys.

They were found dishevelled and emaciated but alive on a muddy ledge 4km inside the cave nine days after they went missing.

The last of the Wild Boars team were brought to the surface on Tuesday.

Thai doctors have said they did not know what type of unusual illnesses the boys may have picked up in the cave.

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