Apple to close iPhone security loophole used by police to access devices

Apple to close iPhone security loophole used by police to access devices

"We have the greatest respect for law enforcement, and we don't design our security improvements to frustrate their efforts to do their jobs", Apple told Reuters. Lightning connectors were first born before Type-C had taken hold of the market, but now that it is used widely in both phones and computers, it makes sense for Apple to move to USB-C. That stand-off ended when the Department of Justice said it had found a third party that could unlock the iPhone without Apple's help.

Apple is reportedly closing a loophole that allows locked iPhones to be accessed without their owners' passcodes, disabling a method often used by law enforcement. It's entirely plausible that Apple would switch that end from USB-A over to USB-C while leaving the Lightning port on the other end intact in order to continue reaping the benefits in accessory licensing. The company went to court in 2016 over its refusal to break into the iPhone of a gunman who, along with his wife, killed 14 people and injured 22 others in San Bernardino, Calif., in December 2015. A brewing legal showdown was defused after the Federal Bureau of Investigation hired professional hackers to crack into the device.

Apple said it was working a fix to mitigate the possibility of accessing data from GrayKey or similar tools.

Apple has been a prominent opponent of demands from authorities for legislation to be created that forces technology companies to maintain access to users' devices.

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The Red Sea port is the only port under rebel control and the coalition says Houthis are using it to smuggle weapons. The importance of Hodeidah lies in the fact that it has one of the key strategic ports on the Red Sea Coast.

Apple has been at the forefront of a battle between tech companies and law enforcement to hand over data in extreme cases.

In recent months, a law enforcement tool called GrayKey has become publicly known as the gold standard for law enforcement agencies trying to break into encrypted iPhones.

"I think that privacy protections are on a collision course with responsible law enforcement actions to conduct legitimate investigations", said Ronald Hosko, a former assistant director of the FBI who is now president of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund, which raises money to defend officers accused of misconduct.

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