Autopsy report: Exploding vape pen killed Florida man

Autopsy report: Exploding vape pen killed Florida man

38-year-old former CNBC producer Tallmadge D'Elia was killed earlier this month in what FEMA is calling the first death caused by an e-cigarette explosion, the Daily Dot reports. Firefighters found D'Elia inside his burning home, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

While such incidents are rare and the death has been ruled accidental, it isn't the first time a spontaneous e-cigarette explosion has raised concerns. He also suffered "thermal injuries", or burns, on roughly 80 percent of his body, the report said. According to a Facebook page for the business, the manufacturer is located in Cebu City in the Philippines.

"It can explode and at that point it can project either the pieces of the lighter itself or the vape pen".

There have been other reports of injuries from vape pens, said the report.

Smok-E Mountain, the company that made the pen D'Elia used, said it doesn't believe their device was to blame and instead pointed the finger at the atomizer - the part that goes in a person's mouth - or the battery.

This is the first reported USA death from a malfunctioning e-cigarette - and it is not surprising news. "The vast majority of vaping devices on the market carry the same fire risk as other products that use lithium-ion batteries, such as cellphones and laptops". "It is this intimate contact between the body and the battery that is most responsible for the severity of the injuries that have been seen".

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The health effects related to the ingestion of e-cigarette vapour are still being studied by government agencies.

Meanwhile, the US Fire Administration released a report on e-cigarette explosions from 2009 to 2016.

E-cigarettes are battery-operated devices that produce an aerosol by heating a liquid, usually containing nicotine, flavorings and other chemicals, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Protect your vape from extreme temperatures by not leaving it in direct sunlight or in a freezing vehicle overnight.

A representative from Smok-E Mountain told ABC Action News that their devices do not explode.

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