Facebook criticised by MPs for 'insufficient evidence' over data handling

Facebook criticised by MPs for 'insufficient evidence' over data handling

The Justice Department and the FBI are investigating Cambridge Analytica, the now-defunct political-data firm at the center of Facebook's data privacy scandal, according to The New York Times.

While Facebook may have managed to distract users from the Cambridge Analytica scandal and win investors through differently-looking-but-exactly-the-same privacy policy, the company has a massive task of investigating all the apps that had access to data of a large number of users to make sure they didn't misuse this access.

Prosecutors have told possible witnesses that there is an open investigation into the company as well as "associated USA persons", according to the Times.

Cambridge Analytica was created around 2013, initially with a focus on US elections, with $15 million in backing from billionaire Republican donor Robert Mercer and a name chosen by future Trump White House adviser Steve Bannon, the New York Times has reported. (NASDAQ:FB) went on to update its terms and conditions to maintain data privacy and restrict access from third-party apps. Where we find evidence that these or other apps did misuse data, we will ban them and notify people via this website. Six million people completed the quiz, with some opting to share their Facebook data with the app. As a steady follow-up of the Guardian's unfurling in the month of March this year, Facebook Inc. With that password, virtually anyone could have access to a trove of information on around 3 million Facebook users. In addition, they will also tell individuals by means of this site.

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The report further claimed that Cambridge Analytica actually tried to get this data too from the researchers David Stillwell and Michal Kosinski of the University of Cambridge's The Psychometrics Centre.

The company also released confidential agreements signed with Cambridge academic Aleksandr Kogan and whistle-blower Christopher Wylie, requiring the deletion of Facebook users' data gathered by Dr Kogan's company GSR. They mentioned that the committee found Schroepfer's responses to questions lacking and asked Zuckerberg to appear or the Facebook CEO will face the consequences.

As a part of a wider investigation, myPersonality app website has now been taken down by Facebook, and the publicly available credentials are non-functional.

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